Producing a New Meaning Outside the Capitalist System: Atsushi Okumaya’s Photography of Local Festivals in The Northeastern Japan

Courtesy of Atsushi Okuyama,  Photo © Atsushi Okuyama

日本語版は下記

In the previous post Mark Fisher’s Magical Voluntarism and Individualist Spiritualism in Japan, I addressed our need of a new, and revised, means of collectivity in this country where the sense of belonging and communal life has been increasingly missed under the neoliberalism.

Through a recent dialogue with a photographer Atsushi Okuyama, I learned about a seemingly absurd, but conflicting, intrinsically anti-neoliberalist nature of what is called ‘dead culture’ such as local festivals, the rites and customs that no longer maintain the original context. While many of local festivals throughout Japan are subsumed under the capitalist system, quite a few of those Okuyama has seen in the depopulated, aging northeastern Japan are operated without economical motives.

His body of work entitled ‘For the Newly Spun Thread’ taken in the northeastern part of Japan is a collection of photographs of such local festivals that neither maintain the original context nor are profitable. Having moved to Shizukuishi of Iwate District in 1998 and since been photographing the northeastern Japan, he began seeking to grasp the deeper sense embedded in the seemingly mere repetitive work, or the pursuit of a new meaning that revives the corpse of the past.

As Okuyama said, “Fortunately or unfortunately, in Tohoku (Northeastern Japan) there are occasions and places where the economic logic does not work. There are indeed festivals that do not return any single yen to the community. So the community has to decide whether to stop or not. Many festivals disappeared through such courses. However, communities also decided not to stop, since they felt, for any concrete reasons, something would be wrong with terminating the practice. In such cases, they need to search or develop the new meaning of the practice–as far as it is operated by human beings, it requires reasons, even if it would be synthetic. My practice of photographing the festivals is parallel to my question on what we can discover in the practice. Although the practice has lost the context and cannot be reconstitutive in today’s economic system, I see there is something that cannot be overlooked.”

Producing new reasons outside the capitalistic system is challenging work but illuminating as such. In so far as it is a collective work, the practice would suggest a new possibility of collectivity.

奥山淳志「新しい糸に」より From the series of ‘For the Newly Spun Thread’ by Atsushi Okuyama

Courtesy of Atsushi Okuyama,  Photo © Atsushi Okuyama

先日、「Mark Fisher’s Magical Voluntarism and Individualist Spiritualism in Japan(マーク・フィッシャーの魔術的ボランタリズムと日本の個人主義的スピリチュアリズム)」のなかで、ネオリベラリズムによって所属感やコミュニティの感覚が著しく失われている日本において、共同体の新しいあり方、見直しが必要と書いた。

そのような矢先、写真家・奥山淳志さんとのやり取りを通じて、形骸化した地域の祭礼や慣習、いわば「死んだ文化」を続けていくことのなかに、不合理さと共に反ネオリベラリズム的な本質が見え隠れすることを知った。日本全国の祭礼の多くが資本主義にのみ込まれながら長らえているが、過疎化・高齢化が進む東北で続けられている祭礼には、経済振興が継続のモチベーションではないものも少なからずあるという。

奥山さんの「新しい糸に」と名付けられたシリーズは、そのような、文脈を失い、同時に「1円の得にもならないような」祭礼の写真をまとめたものだ。1998年に岩手県・雫石に移り住み、東北の写真を撮るようになってから、奥山さんは、ただの反復活動に見える祭礼に—-そして、過去の遺産に新たな息を吹き込もうとする試みに—-込められている深い意味を捉えたい、と考えるようになった。

奥山さんは私にこう語ってくれた。

「幸か不幸か、この東北には経済言語が通用しないという場面や場所もあるわけです。言葉を悪く行ってしまうと1円の得にもならない祭礼なんかもあるんです。じゃあ、もう辞めるのか。それで実際に辞めた祭礼もたくさんあります。でも、辞めるのはどこか引っかかる。[…]そうなったとき、営むのは人間ですから、どこかに意味を見出す必要があるわけです。たとえ無理やりにでも。僕の興味はそこにあって、本来の意味を失い、だからといって経済の中で再構築もできない営みの中に何を見出すか。そこに何か素通りできないものを感じています。」

新たな意味を資本主義システムの外に生み出すことは、決して簡単なことではないだけに、その試み自体が光明に見える。それは共同作業であり、それゆえ、新たな共同体のあり方を示してくれるのではないかと感じている。

Advertisements
View All

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s