The Autobiophotography of Women 01: Tamiko Nishimura

A Miko Dancer Konohamano Sakuya Hime (2016, Zen Foto Gallery) ©Tamiko Nishimura

日本語版は英語版の下にあります

I attended a talk session by photographer Tamiko Nishimura and former dancer Sugie Sumie (a.k.a. Konohanano Sakuya Hime) at Zen Foto Gallery, Tokyo on October 29, 2016. The talk was organised as the opening event of Nishimura’s photography exhibition ‘A Miko Dancer Konohanano Sakuya Hime.’ After long years of friendship, they united to show and publish their works from the early 80’s under the support of the gallery.

Tamiko Nishimura (1948-) is a Japanese female photographer who began photographing in the 60’s, the time when there were only a few women practicing photography. Back in those days, eyes on female photographers were piercing and harsh. Their photography was seen as scandalous and hardly as works of art. Nishimura recalled such condition in her previous talk session with photographer Kazuo Kitai:

They saw women photographing and the works as some form of entertainment, or low art.

In the early 80’s, Nishimura joined and photographed Sugie’s journey of dedicating her dance to shrines at multiple locations in Japan for a few times. ‘The collection of photographs was, at the first sight, perplexing to me.’ As the gallery manager Amanda Lo remarked, the body of work which was supposed to feature a miko* dancer reveals a multifaceted female subjectivity: a miko a dancer, a person with a gender identity, and a mother.

*Miko is commonly recognised as shrine maidens who perform rituals and operate for a Shinto shrine, but originally  they are known for their shamanic ability of receiving divine messages and role as the mediator for the world between gods and that of human.

Nishimura mentioned that she never intended to criticize the male-dominant photography world of the time or the socio-political condition of the 60’s. Instead of trying to incorporate a feminist point of view into her photography, she tried to capture the aura of someone or something beyond our visible reality throughout her entire photographic career. As we could see something beyond the light and wind she captured in her Shikishima series, we can experience similar sensations in her photographs capturing Sugie’s divinely inspired dance performance.

Still, since the editorial work did not exclude images of the daily lives of a woman on a journey with her two children, there is no doubt that it allowed the work to highlight the living condition of Japanese women and the reality of women who do not fit in with the majority.

It is easy to imagine that Sugie’s life and practice were alienated from the society of the time. Sugie, who once joined a butoh dancers group, recalled that she felt something wrong with involving show business as a dancer and felt comfortable in dedicating her dance to gods and living with donations. She embarked on the journey since she ‘received the name of a female god in Japanese myth Kojiki (Records of Ancient Matters) “Konohanano Sakuya Hime” in a dream.’

It was in the early 80’s, when Japanese society was enjoying the rapid economic development and becoming increasingly secular. Salary-men purchased, with their lifting incomes, cars, properties and stocks, and OLs (office ladies) were to catch up with the world’s trends. Sugie’s practice could have be seen as outdated, and, in today’s eyes, as what has been lost.

While the society saw a greater centralisation to the capital Tokyo, two women took on journeys to the periphery. Nishimura’s debut work Shikishima that made her name as a photographer was taken during her journey in the 70’s. Many male photographers also traveled across the country and produced their masterpieces at that time. However, differently from most of these works, Nishimura and Sugie’s practice were not based on ideology, not a form of protest, nor was it a means of recording that could become an anthropological or historical contribution. Such a factor enabled them to be inherently outsiders and therefore, intrinsically rebellious.

Nishimura’s two bodies of works, A Miko Dancer Konohanano Sakuya Hime and Kittenish… are remarkable as both are, firstly, collections of photography of a woman created by a woman which were rarely (and were not supposed to) exposed to the eyes of public in the time; Secondly, both works happened to capture women in, so called, restricted areas: domains of gods, and behind closed-doors in a girl’s room. In passing, Shikishima, too, bears a sense of loneliness of a solo-traveler. Regardless of where Nishimura and Sugie were in this three-dimensional world, they were outsiders, or, hidden too deeply inside themselves.

Kittenish… was produced for Camera Mainichi magazine as it was to feature four girls (not women) photographers in 1970. Nishimura decided to take pictures of her friend and the work was completed in a single night. In Kittenish… the images inevitably challenged—although she would deny for having such an intention—a conception of portrait and nude photography that objectified and mystified women, and closely connected the photographer and the woman being photographed together. The intimate images are far from erotic, and even too realistic for women to face up to.

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-17-29-45Kittenish… (Zen Foto Gallery, 2015) ©Tamiko Nishimura

If I took photographs, having abandoned my identity as a woman, I think this would leave me with no sense of reality. This doesn’t mean that I take photographs with a conscious sense of being a woman; just as from birth a man is a man, without being simply a woman, for me there is no beginning. (Tamiko Nishimura, excerpt from Kittenish…)

In A Miko Dancer Konohanano Sakuya Hime, Nishimura’s photography gained a wider scope, addressing a more complicated, matured woman’s life wherein viewers see a female subjectivity with feelings of alienation, yet also desires to relate to the society (or ‘universe’ in a transcendental sense) in her own right. Women are more likely to be isolated in the society for maternal roles then and now, which partly formed the common misconception that women’s work are mostly domestic rather than creative or lofty. Yet as we look at the mother and her children through Nishimura’s eyes, we start questioning if there was a door between the secular and the sacred and between artistic work and the mundane life, as children could flip the door so lightly and change the scene entirely to the point of being subversive.

It is easy to imagine that such kind of artistic practice of Nishimura and Sugie was intrinsically incompatible with the movement of the photography world of the time. While Sugie and Nishimura were on their journey, led by Sugie’s fate and Nishimura’s curiosity, there was a movement dedicating photography to critique and provocation going on in Tokyo. In light of the new consciousness of photography, its validity and social significance reflecting the rise of leftist ideology and Marxism which require self-criticism, Nishimura’s stance of purely following her curiosity and Sugie following her fate of a divinely inspired life could become a subject of criticism, even though it connected the two artists together.

However, Nishimura has been faithful to her philosophy and beliefs. In response to my question asking if her work really did not contain even a slightest sense of protest against the patriarchal society, such as the male-dominant photography field, as well as anpo and zenkyoto protests (Japanese May 1968 equivalent) which were in reality the fights of men in the eyes of women, she answered:

I never wanted to fight against something insubstantial.

Indeed, the zenkyoto protest came to many miserable and devastating ends. Provoke, the photographers’ movement with dadaist orientation dissolved, leaving numbers of followers merely employing the arebureboke grainy, blurred, and out-of-focus style. Still, ideologies have united people and worked as a catalyst of social changes.

I still need to question, based on the enduring, inner conflict between two opposite positions; on one hand with a sympathy towards typical Japanese women who are likely to dismiss their rage at inequality and prejudice for the sake of their, often beautiful, pacifist nature; on the other hand with a rationale, which is perhaps more westernised and feminist, that having a solid societal consciousness and solidarity is the only way to change their condition: if a photographer does not seeks for influence and power, but intimacy and friendship, or something which is incompatible with power in the conventional sense, do they still need to be consciously critical?

As the opening of this series, I leave this question open, which would repeatedly come back when we review Japanese postwar photography, specifically of those produced by women.

About The Autobiophotography of Women
For me, as a woman and Japanese, looking at Japanese postwar photography is to witness women who fascinated photographers and being portrayed as objects. They attract viewers’ eyes and reject them at once, as if they are forever ungraspable. As a wife, a prostitute, an old woman, an unfamiliar woman; a being that accepts and represents irrationality; one with plump legs, one wearing red rouge, and one with shiny, long black hair; a secondary character who brings a conflict or mystery in a narrative or an “I” novel; A tough rebel in a personal territory. We have seen an abundance of such images of women.

The essay series, ‘The Autobiophotography of Women’ is my project to observe women from the post-war period as creators.

&&&

2016年10月29日、禅フォトギャラリーで開催された西村多美子とすぎえすみえ(木花咲耶姫)のトークセッションに参加した。トークは西村の写真展 「舞人木花咲耶姫」のオープニング記念として企画されたものだ。西村とすぎえは、禅フォトの支援により、80年代に共に取り組んだ作品を作品集としてまとめることとなった。

西村多美子は日本の女性写真家で、まだほんのわずかの女性しか写真に取り組んでいない60年代に写真を始めていた。当時の女性写真家への目は辛辣で厳しいものだった。女性が写真を撮ることをスキャンダラスなものとして見ており、アート作品として扱うようなことは決してなかったという。西村は北井一夫とのトークイベントで、その状況を以下のように表した。

写真を撮る女性とその作品は、風俗のようなものとして見られていた。

80年代の始め頃西村は、舞を全国各地の神社に奉納するすぎえの旅に度々参加し、写真を撮っていた。

「その写真の束を初めて西村さんから見せてもらった時、驚きを隠せなかった」と、出版元兼ギャラリーのマネージャー、アマンダ・ラが振り返るように「巫女の舞人」を撮ったはずの写真群は、多種多様な顔を持つ女性を——巫女であり、舞踏家であり、女性であり、母である女性を——捉えていた。

男性主体の写真界や60年代の社会への批判として写真を撮ったことはなかったと語る西村に、フェミニスト的な視点を写真に反映させる意図は見られない。その旅も、それまでと同じくアウラやリアリティの向こう側にあるものを撮ることが目的だった。私たちが「しきしま」の写真に西村が感じた光や風を見るように「それ」は確かに、すぎえの神懸かり的な舞の写真に息づき、私たちは「その」瞬間を見ることができる。

しかしながら、二人の子どもと旅する女性の日常の風景を積極的に含める編集方針をとったことにより、「舞人木花咲耶姫」シリーズは否応無く、当時の日本人女性のおかれていた環境と多数派と異なる方向性を持つ女性のリアリティに光をあてている。

すぎえの暮らしや活動がその頃の社会と相容れないものであったことは想像に難くない。舞踏集団に一時期属していたすぎえは、踊る者として興行に携わることに違和感を感じ、神に舞を奉納し寄付で生きることのほうが合っていることに気づいたと振り返った。古事記にも印される木花咲耶姫の「名前を頂き」すぎえは全国行脚の旅に出た。

それは、80年代始めのこと。日本社会が高度経済成長のなか、より一層、神性と遠ざかりつつあった頃だ。サラリーマンは順調に昇ってゆく賃金により、車、不動産、株を買い、OLは海外のトレンドに追いつこうと躍起になっていた。そのなかで、すぎえの活動は時代遅れに見えただろう。それは今日では翻って「失われたもの」として見られるかも知れない。

東京への中央集権化が進むなかで、二人の女性は周辺へと旅をしていた。西村のデビュー作であり、彼女が写真家としての評価を得るようになったきっかけでもある『しきしま』は、西村が70年代に日本各地を旅した際に撮られたものだ。多くの男性写真家もまた、日本各地を旅し傑作を生み出してきた。しかしながら、西村とすぎえの活動は、イデオロギーにもとづくことなく、抵抗でもなく、また人類学的、歴史学的貢献を意図する記録でもない。そのことが彼女たちを生粋のアウトサイダーに、そして本質的な反逆者たらしめていた所以であろう。

西村の二つの作品、「舞人木花咲耶姫」と「猫が...」の共通点といえば、ひとつに、そのような時代に、女性が女性を撮った写真であると言えるだろう。もうひとつに、それらの写真がある意味での社会の外側、または容易に他人の見ることのできない場所・機会で撮られたということがある。それは巫女という「神」に接する領域であり、そして「女の子の部屋」という密室であったことである。(「しきしま」にも、一人旅の開放感と背中合わせの寂しさが見られる。)それらは、この時空のどのような位置にあろうと、何かの外側、または、あまりにも深い内部にあった。

「猫が...」は1970年に4人の「女の子(女性ではなく)」写真家を特集しようとしていた『カメラ毎日』の依頼を受けて撮られたものだ。西村は友人を撮ることに決め、一晩で撮りあげた。その写真は——西村はそんな意図はないと否定しそうだが——それまでの女性を対象化し神秘化してきたポートレイト写真、ヌード写真を挑発し、写真家と撮られる女性の間の隔たりを埋めるかのようだ。それらのイメージはエロティックなものとは程遠く、女性であっても直視を避けたくなるほどリアリスティックだ。

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-17-29-45

私は、私が女であることを放棄して写真を撮ったところで、それは私にとって何のリアリティも持たないと思う。それは、ことさら女を意識して写真を撮るという意味では決してなく、生まれた時から男が男であるように、私が女であるということからしか、何も始まらないということだ。

比べて「舞人木花咲耶姫」では「猫が...」よりも広く開けた視野で、より複雑で、成熟した女性の生き様が撮られている。私たちはそこに、疎外感を感じながらも自分なりの方法で大きなものと繋がっていこうとする女性の主観性を見ることができる。女性は昔も今も子育てによって社会から孤立しやすく、そのことにより女性の活動は長らく、創造的で崇高なものではなく家庭的なものとみなされてきたが、西村の視線を通してその母子を見ると「聖」と「俗」や、芸術的な活動と日常の些末な営みの間に扉は存在しないのではと思えてくる。子どもたちはいとも軽々とそのドアを開き、風景をがらりと変えてしまう。それは破壊的といってもいいほどだ。

&&&

二人の活動や表現が、当時の写真界の潮流とは相容れないものだったことは想像に難くない。すぎえが宿命に導かれるように、西村がそんなすぎえに惹き付けられて、全国で旅を繰り広げている頃、東京では、写真を批判と挑発のためのミディウムとするムーブメントが興っていた。西村の自身の興味を純粋に追求する姿勢や、すぎえの天命を尽くそうとする人生観は、二人の関係性を育みながらも——自己批判を要求する——左翼思想、マルクス主義の高まりと呼応するように生まれた写真にまつわる新たな意識、正当性や社会的意義のなかでは、批判の対象ともなり得ただろう。

しかしながら西村は、自身の哲学、または信念に忠実であり続けた。女性の目には男の闘争として映ったとも言われる安保運動や全共闘のような運動や、当時の圧倒的男性優位の写真界への反抗が彼女の作品にほんの少しでも含まれてはいないのかと尋ねる私にこう答えた。

私はいつも、実体のないものと闘うのは嫌だと思っていた。

実に、全共闘の収束のしかたとその後の経過は、時にみじめで、時に破滅的なものだった。プロヴォークのムーブメントはアレ・ブレ・ボケと呼ばれる「スタイル」と多くのフォロワーを残して緩やかに分解していった。それでも、イデオロギーは人々を結びつけ、社会変革の起爆剤となり得るものだ。

偏見や不公平なことへの怒りを追いやってきた(それは、和を重んじる美徳のためか、はたまた...?)日本人女性への共感と、社会的視点をもとに団結することが状況を変える唯一の方法という、より西洋的・フェミニスト的な意識の間で揺れながらも、私はもう一度考えてみたいと思う。もし写真家が影響力や権力といった「力」ではなく、親密さや友情、または、「力」とは相容れない何かを追求していたのだとすれば?それでも彼らは意識的に批判的であるべきだったのか?

エッセイ・シリーズ「The Autobiophotography of Women」の始まりとして、私はこの疑問を未解決のまま残しておこうと思う。この問いは、日本の戦後写真を見る時——それが女性のものならば特に——何度も問いかけられるものであることは明らかだからだ。

&&&

About The Autobiophotography of Women
女であり、日本人であるという自覚をもとに日本の戦後写真を観ることは、いかに女性が写真家たちを魅了し、だからこそ、被写体=対象物として捉えられてきたかを見ることだった。視線を引きつけ同時に跳ね返すような——永遠に理解不能な存在であるかのように。妻として、娼婦として、老婆として、見知らぬ女として。不条理をのみ込み体現する存在として。肉付きのよい太ももを持つ女として。紅い口紅をまとう女として。艶やかな黒髪を風になびかせる女として。物語を、私小説を展開させる登場人物として。私的領域での手強い反逆者として。私たちはそんな女のイメージを溢れるほど見てきた。

エッセイシリーズ「The Autobiophotography of Women」は戦後と呼ばれる時代の日本の女性を「つくり手」としてみるための試みである。

Advertisements
View All

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s